Dr. Anna Hammond, DPT, OCS

Anna is a Physical Therapist and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. She works closely with women in our online support group for Pelvic Floor Perfect and Diastasis Fix - programs that have helped thousands of women recover from pelvic floor issues, diastasis recti, SI Joint dysfunction and more. She is also a contributor to The Pregnancy and Postpartum Corrective Specialist Certification - the world-renowned women's health certification for professionals.

What is the IT Band? The IT Band stands for the iliotibial band. It is a thick band of fibrous tissue that runs from the outside of your hip to the outside of your knee. It is the accumulation of the fascia from all of the glute muscles and the tensor fascia latae (TFL) (Flatto …

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If you missed part 1 of this article on what is hip impingement be sure to check it out! Hip Impingement Exercises When attempting to heal hip impingement without surgery, you won’t necessarily be changing the bony deformations or integrity of the labrum, but you’ll focus more on improving the joint mechanics through muscle reeducation, …

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What Is Hip Impingement? The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. It consists of the end of your femur (upper leg bone) which has a round end (shaped like a ball) that sits in a cup-shaped socket of your pelvis known as the acetabulum. The acetabulum and femurs both have articular cartilage on …

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What to Know About C-section Recovery: You’ve made it through your pregnancy and delivery and have now reached your 6-week check up. Hopefully things are healing well from a surgical standpoint and your doctor has cleared you for activity. However, the details on the “what” or “how” are very vague, and often stated as “ease …

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What is a c-section, and when might you need one? A cesarean section (or c-section) is a very common, well-established operation that many women have. Reasons for a c-section may include prolonged labor, high risk pregnancy, large babies, multiples, fetal distress, breech presentation, a previous cesarean where vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is not advised …

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You may have taken the plunge to start thinking about your feet, read or heard some about barefoot running, or maybe you’ve simply gotten used to pandemic life of no shoes and are asking yourself, “can I work out barefoot?” The benefits of exercising without shoes Being able to stack our ribs over our pelvis …

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A cesarean section (or c-section) is a very common, well-established operation that many women have when delivering a child. In fact, the cesarean section surgery rate is about a third of all births in the United States of America.(1) This procedure is used for many reasons including prolonged labor, high risk pregnancy, large babies, multiples, …

C-section: Reasons, Risks, Recovery Read More »

If you have pain in your feet, heels, or Achilles tendon – fallen arches, locked arches, or are looking to transition to a more minimalist shoe wear – or even have hip, core and pelvic floor problems that feel stuck in progress – here is a guide for you to explore your arch function and …

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What is Diastasis? A diastasis recti is a thinning of the fascia known as the linea alba that connects each side of your abdominal wall together. The linea alba runs down the midline from your ribs to your pubic bone and the thinning can be at various locations and varying degrees down the abdominal wall. …

Diastasis Recti: Definition, Causes and Treatment Read More »

What is Diastasis Recti? Diastasis recti is a thinning of the linea alba, which is the connective tissue where your rectus abdominis muscle (six pack ab muscles) meets in the middle from your pubic bone all the way up to your ribs. It is made up of the aponeurosis (think saran wrap) that is around …

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